1 US-MONGOLIA 'THIRD NEIGHBOR TRADE ACT' ON THE WAY WWW.THEDIPLOMAT.COM PUBLISHED:2018/11/17      2 CHINA'S FIGHT AGAINST SMOG MAKES PALLADIUM 2018'S BEST METAL WWW.MINING.COM PUBLISHED:2018/11/17      3 MILLENNIUM CHALLENGE CORPORATION PRESENTS GMS LICENSES WWW.MONTSAME.MN PUBLISHED:2018/11/17      4 MONGOLIA CALLS FOR GLOBAL ATTENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE WWW.NEWS.MN PUBLISHED:2018/11/17      5 ADB OPENS A NEW WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT IN ARVAIKHEER, MONGOLIA WWW.AGENPARL.EU PUBLISHED:2018/11/17      6 CHINA TO BOOST COOPERATION WITH INDIA, MONGOLIA: DEFENSE MINISTER WWW.GLOBALTIMES.CN PUBLISHED:2018/11/17      7 DEATH ON MONGOLIA’S ‘COAL ROAD’ WWW.NEWS.MN PUBLISHED:2018/11/17      8 MONGOLIA SHAKEN BY WIDENING LOAN SCANDAL WWW.ASIA.NIKKEI.COM PUBLISHED:2018/11/17      9 MONGOLIA’S UNEMPLOYMENT FALLS BY 2.2 PERCENT WWW.NEWS.MN PUBLISHED:2018/11/16      10 MEETING MEAT DEMAND: MONGOLIA TO TRADE 17.9 PERCENT OF LIVESTOCK WWW.NEWS.MN PUBLISHED:2018/11/16      БНСУ-ЫН АЖ АХУЙН НЭГЖҮҮДИЙН АУТСОРСИНГ ЗАХИАЛГЫГ ГҮЙЦЭТГЭХ ЗАЛУУЧУУДЫГ СОНГОН, ШАЛГАРУУЛНА WWW.UNUUDUR.MN НИЙТЭЛСЭН:2018/11/17     НҮҮРСНИЙ ЭКСПОРТ 10 ХУВИАР ӨСӨЖ, 31.3 САЯ ТОНН БОЛОВ WWW.GOGO.MN НИЙТЭЛСЭН:2018/11/17     СУДАЛГААГААР ЖДҮ ЭРХЛЭГЧИД ЗЭЭЛИЙН ХҮҮНИЙ ЗАРДАЛ ХАМГИЙН ИХ ХҮНДРЭЛ УЧРУУЛДАГ ГЭЖ ХАРИУЛЖЭЭ WWW.BLOOMBERGTV.MN НИЙТЭЛСЭН:2018/11/17     ERDENE RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT: ХАЙГУУЛЫН ЗАРДАЛ III УЛИРАЛД 42 ХУВИАР БУУРСАН WWW.BLOOMBERGTV.MN НИЙТЭЛСЭН:2018/11/17     ГОРХИ, ТЭРЭЛЖИЙН БАЙГАЛИЙН БОХИРДОЛД АНХААРАЛ ХАНДУУЛЖ ЭХЛЭВ WWW.MONTSAME.MN НИЙТЭЛСЭН:2018/11/17     ИРЭХ БААСАН ГАРАГТ ХОТЫН ДАРГЫГ ОГЦРУУЛАХ ЭСЭХИЙГ ХЭЛЭЛЦЭНЭ WWW.MONTSAME.MN НИЙТЭЛСЭН:2018/11/17     “АМГАЛАН” ХОТХОНД БАЙРЛАХ ГЭРТЭЭ КАННАБИС ТАРЬЖ, УРГУУЛЖ БАЙСАН ТУРК ИРГЭНИЙГ БАРИВЧИЛЖЭЭ WWW.MEDEE.MN НИЙТЭЛСЭН:2018/11/17     ӨНӨӨДӨР АВТОМАШИНЫ ДУГААРЫН ХЯЗГААРЛАЛТ ҮЙЛЧЛЭХГҮЙ WWW.EAGLE.MN НИЙТЭЛСЭН:2018/11/17     ГАШУУНСУХАЙТЫН НҮҮРСТЭЙ МАШИНЫ ЦУВАА 120 КМ БОЛЖЭЭ WWW.EAGLE.MN НИЙТЭЛСЭН:2018/11/16     ТАТВАРЫН ОРЛОГО 32.2 ХУВИАР ӨСӨЖ, ТӨСВИЙН ТЭНЦЭЛ 341.9 ТЭРБУМ ТӨГРӨГИЙН АШИГТАЙ ГАРЛАА WWW.BLOOMBERGTV.MN НИЙТЭЛСЭН:2018/11/16    

Events

Name organizer Where
Frontier's "Invest Mongolia Tokyo 2018" Frontier Securities Tokyo Japan
"Open to Export" ICC WTO International business award ICC WTO London

NEWS

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Beyond Genghis Khan: how looting threatens to erase Mongolia's history www.theguardian.com

It’s a sunny, late summer day in northern Mongolia’s Darkhad Basin – a large glacial lake basin nestled against the country’s Russian border. To the south stretch the grasslands of the Eastern Eurasian Steppe; to the north, the Siberian boreal forest. We stand – almost precisely – at the place they meet, at the forest’s edge overlooking a large, grassy valley the administrative district of Ulaan Uul. We’ve come to this site, known locally as Khorigiin Am, in response to reports from local herders of bones and artifacts lying on the ground surface. What we find is shocking –scraps of silk, hastily scattered pieces of wooden artifacts – and bone, human bone, everywhere.

My companion, Dr J Bayarsaikhan, finishes a tally of the looted burial craters that dot the hillside. “More than forty,” he tells me, surveying the scene in front of us with dismay. We work through the evening to salvage what we can from the dozens of looted burial mounds, which from the fragmented artifacts we find, appear to date to the time of the Great Mongol Empire – around 800 years ago.

Mongolia’s cold, dry climate can sometimes result in incredible archaeological discoveries, preserving organic materials like ancient clothing and weaponry that might otherwise have disintegrated. However, looting makes short work of these rare finds. “[Organic artifacts] are more unstable than some other kinds of artifacts, like stone or metal” says Sandra Vanderwarf, a cultural heritage preservation fellow at the American Center for Mongolian Studies (ACMS), who works at the National Museum of Mongolia.

When materials such as skin, sinew, or seeds are recovered from archaeological sites, researchers get a rare glimpse of information like how the object was made, what kinds of animals and plants were used to produce it, or where these animals and plants came from. Over time, these little bits of rare archaeological data come together to help us understand processes like migration, globalisation, and human responses to climate change – forces that are rapidly shaping our modern world.

Looters sell or destroy these rare objects, exposing whatever may be left to the elements, where they quickly disintegrate through exposure to weather, sun, animals, and people. It’s difficult to say how long the scraps of decorated silk or finely incised bone and bark we recover may have already sat at the surface, decomposing – but the looting appears to have been recent. Nonetheless, much has already been lost.

Sadly, the story of our day at Khorigiin Am is far from unique. As Mongolia struggles its way through a shocking and prolonged economic downturn, opportunistic looters are destroying the nation’s culture heritage, in search of gold or other attractive artifacts. Although looting has always taken place to some degree, artifacts can now be sold in the capital of Ulaanbaatar, or increasingly – with the advent of social media – to buyers on Facebook. From there, many of these artifacts will be sent to dealers and collectors overseas, without the general public or even most Mongolian scholars learning of their existence.

As one of the world’s largest countries by geographic area, but smallest by population density, the logistical challenges of protecting archaeological sites or enforcing punishment against looters in Mongolia are overwhelming. “Because to date there have been no monitoring efforts, we can’t say just how bad it has become” says Dr Julia Clark, an archaeologist and the Cultural Heritage Director at ACMS. Clark has also noticed that archaeological research projects can actually encourage and guide the efforts of looters, who might otherwise have left sites undisturbed. “Unfortunately,” she says, “people sometimes think that we’re stealing gold and treasure, and want to get some for themselves.” With few resources to allocate towards anti-looting efforts, anonymity is the only line of defence for many of the nation’s archaeological sites.

This looting has serious consequences for Mongolia, and for the rest of the world. Many of us outside of Mongolia know little about the country or its history, beyond what we glean from dramatised or fictional depictions in popular culture, like Netflix’s popular (if critically maligned) Marco Polo series. As a result, the nation’s contributions to global cultural heritage have gone largely underappreciated. This problem is compounded by the scarcity of historical documents produced by ancient nomadic peoples – meaning that history was often written by outsiders, who tended to emphasise military brutality rather than highlight cultural achievements. With its rich material record of the past, archaeology provides a complementary, alternative lens into the people, animals, and history behind the great Khans and the peoples that came before them.

“To most [foreign] people,” says Dr Bryan Miller, a postdoctoral research fellow at Oxford University specialising in Mongolian and Chinese history, “Mongolia is Genghis Khan. But he’s seen as this kind of spark. He didn’t just come out of nowhere.” To understand the full story behind the Mongol Empire and appreciate its legacy for the modern world, Miller says, we need to protect and study the region’s history (and prehistory). 

The situation, though bleak, is far from hopeless. In a televised speech on the floor of the Ikh Khural (National Assembly), representative G Munkhtsetseg acknowledged the struggle faced by those working to protect cultural heritage in Mongolia, and expressed a desire to support and listen to their voices going forward. For Mongolia’s beleaguered cultural heritage professionals, the words were a welcome change. In recent years, Mongolia has also managed to pass legislation mandating archaeological survey for mining projects, and for the first time, instituting harsh penalties (including prison time) for those convicted of looting or trafficking in antiquities – resulting in some important victories by local law enforcement.

Through the education and public outreach efforts of archaeologists at the National Museum and the country’s other major archaeological research institutions (including the National University and the Cultural Resource Management Division at the Institute of Archaeology/Mongolian Academy of Sciences), a new generation of students and herders are learning the importance of archaeology and its relevance to their history and heritage. In many areas, local people have become dedicated stewards of the monuments and sites in the area they live. Clark, Bayarsaikhan, and their colleagues are working to develop programs which help quantify and monitor looting, as well as educate others about the goals of archaeology and the damage caused by looting.

Cultural heritage protection is not just Mongolia’s problem. As the United States’ recent withdrawal from the international UNESCO agreement demonstrates, it is instead an urgent, global issue – one that is unlikely to recede in coming years. For archaeology to stay relevant, researchers and authorities alike must demonstrate its value in the public eye – even in times of economic crisis and limited political support. Doing that means teaching the public, particularly younger generations, that studying and protecting the past is the only way to understand our future. “It’s a fight that we are never going to stop fighting,” says Miller. “But at least we have to try.”

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Bodies of all 17 mountaineers found at Mongolia’s Mount Otgontenger www.borneobulletin.com.bn

ULAN BATOR (Xinhua) – The bodies of all 17 mountaineers, who went missing after success-fully climbing to the summit of Mount Otgontenger in Mongolia despite a ban, have been found, the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) of Mongolia said yesterday.

Brigadier General Gombojav Ariunbuyan, first deputy head of the NEMA, said at a press conference that the climbers could have fallen from the cliff.

The 17 Mongolians, including seven women, were among a group of 27 climbers who successfully stood on Mount Otgontenger, the highest peak of the Khangai Mountains in Mongolia standing 4,021 metres above sea level. But they ran into an avalanche during their descent and were reported missing Sunday.

The bodies were found at an altitude of 3,200-3,450 metres on the mountain, the NEMA official said. A rescue team from the NEMA searched for the missing mountaineers from October 23-25, discovering 10 bodies Monday. Four more were found Tuesday and the last three found yesterday.

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Foreign Minister affirms to support SMEs www.montsame.mn

Ulaanbaatar /MONTSAME/ On October 26, Foreign Minister D.Tsogtbaatar met representatives of business entities and professional associations to discuss and exchange views on a current state of the country's foreign trade.

At the meeting, D.Tsogtbaatar highlighted that the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and diplomatic missions will help develop small and medium enterprises increase exports, facilitate trade, introduce cutting-edge technologies and cooperate in resolving issues together.

Co-organized by the Mongolian National Chamber of Commerce and Industry, and the Mongolian Employers' Federation, the meeting was attended by officials of the Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Light Industry, the Mongolian Customs, the General Agency for Specialized Investigation, the National Development Agency and the Mongolian Agency for Standard and Metrology, as well as over 150 businesspeople.
B.Tugsbilig

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October 26, 2017 trading report www.mse.mn

On October 26, 2017, 111,841 shares of 23 firms listed as Tier I, II, and III were traded. 7 firms’ shares increased in price, 14 decreased and 2 remained unchanged. Mongol Post JSC /MNP/ was the top performer, increasing 3.33 percent, whereas E-Trans Logistic JSC /ETR/ was the worst performer, decreasing 9.44 percent.

The MSE ALL Index rose 0.43 percent to stand at 1,141.76. The MSE market cap stands at MNT 2,216,340,498,415.

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Oyu Tolgoi releases Q3 2017 results setting three operational records www.ot.mn

Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia - Oyu Tolgoi today released the latest edition of its scorecard updating its performance for the third quarter of 2017.

The All Injury Frequency Rate personal safety measure was 0.25 per 200,000 hours worked in the third quarter, including operations and the underground project. Maintaining its focus on safety, Oyu Tolgoi invested in 174,179 hours of safety training across its workforce of over 11,000 employees and contractors over the period.

Oyu Tolgoi continued its world class environmental performance, achieving water use performance at 0.406 cubic metres of water per tonne of ore processed, and a recycling rate of 86.5 per cent – the best among its peers in the industry.

Over the quarter, Oyu Tolgoi continued its positive contribution to the Umnugobi region, and Mongolia overall, through tax and other payments, procurement activities and investment in sustainable development projects. National procurement spend reached US$234mn in the third quarter of 2017, tax payments US$120.5mn and, cumulative in-country spend between 2010, when major construction on the mine began, to the end of September 2017 crossed US$6.7bn.

Gobi Oyu Development Support Fund continued to support sustainable development projects in Umnugobi. An expansion of the Khanbogd Heating Plant commenced to further support improvements in facilities and infrastructure in the local community.

Q3’17 Production

During the third quarter, Oyu Tolgoi set three operational records for total material mined, ore treated and average daily concentrator throughput.

In Q3’17, material mined increased 9.0 per cent over Q2’17, and ore treated increased 10.1 per cent over Q2’17. During Q2’17, the concentrator underwent a scheduled maintenance shutdown. Average daily concentrator throughput for Q3’17 of 115,400 tonnes increased 8.9 per cent over Q2’17. Copper production in Q3’17 was essentially flat, compared to Q2’17, while Q3’17 gold production increased 29.2 per cent over Q2’17 due to higher head grades from the medium-grade stockpile and Phase 4A. Higher gold grades during Q3’17 resulted in a 26.1 per cent increase in gold sales compared to Q2’17.

Turquoise Hill expects Oyu Tolgoi to produce 130,000 to 160,000 tonnes of copper and 100,000 to 140,000 ounces of gold in concentrates for 2017. Open-pit operations are expected to mine in Phases 4 and 6 during the year. In addition, stockpiled ore will continue to be processed during 2017.

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Russia to invest billions of dollars in Saudi Arabia’s future megacity www.rt.com

Russia wants to be an investor in Saudi Arabia’s project to build the Neom megacity, which will be 33 times bigger than New York City. The project will be financed by the Saudi government and private investors and powered entirely by wind and solar energy.
"The Russian Direct Investment Fund (RDIF) wants to be a co-investor with other international funds. The Fund will attract leading Russian companies to invest in the creation of the city of Neom, thereby contributing to their high-tech expansion in the promising markets of Saudi Arabia and the entire Middle East," RDIF CEO Kirill Dmitriev told reporters on Thursday.

"We are talking about investments worth several billion dollars," he said. The day before, Dmitriev met the Saudi crown prince to discuss further investment cooperation between Russia and Saudi Arabia.

As part of the work on Neom, RDIF plans to attract leading Russian companies working in solar energy, health, artificial intelligence technologies, high-speed transport, and the construction of port infrastructure.

RDIF, which is already an investor in Hyperloop, said the technology can be successfully used in Neom.

According to Dmitriev, Russian companies could also help turn Neom into a hub for the export of Russian agricultural products to the Middle East.

"We believe the opportunity to work with the world's leading technology companies in such an interesting place, with the support of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, is a very interesting proposal," he said.

The city will be powered entirely by wind and solar energy. Neom, which will focus on food, entertainment, biotechnology, etc., is an attempt by Saudi Arabia to diversify its revenue, which has slumped as oil prices collapsed in 2014.

The 26,500 square km (10,230 square miles) zone will be situated on Saudi Arabia’s border with Jordan and Egypt and will require $500 billion in investment.

The megacity is adjacent to the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aqaba and near maritime trade routes that use the Suez Canal.

“Neom is situated on one of the world’s most prominent economic arteries... Its strategic location will also facilitate the zone’s rapid emergence as a global hub that connects Asia, Europe, and Africa,” Prince Mohammed bin Salman said.

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China working on building free trade ports www.chinadaily.com.cn

BEIJING - The Ministry of Commerce is working on the building of free trade ports in China's free trade zones (FTZs), a spokesman said Thursday.

China will grant more power to pilot free trade zones and explore the opening of free trade ports, according to a key report delivered last week at the 19th National Congress of the Communist Party of China.

The ministry should "follow higher standards and push for more comprehensive and deeper opening up," spokesman Gao Feng said at a press conference Thursday.

"The ministry is currently working with Shanghai Municipality and other departments on making the plan [for building free trade ports]," Gao said.

The Shanghai FTZ will build a top-level free trade port and implement trade supervision regulations in accordance with higher standards, according to a document made public in March by the State Council.

The FTZ in East China's Zhejiang province also aims to build a high-standard pilot free trade port to push international commodity trade liberalization with a focus on oil products.

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Key Takeaways from "Invest Mongolia 2017 Ulaanbaatar" www.mongolianbusinessdatabase.com

Between September 4 and 5, Frontier LLC hosted the eleventh annual conference of Invest Mongolia at the Shangri-La Hotel, Ulaanbaatar. The conference was attended by 1100 participants, the largest number to date.

As in past years, Invest Mongolia 2017 brought together speakers from the public and private sectors, international experts and foreign investors. However, this year’s conference was even more significant than those in previous years because the Government of Mongolia was a co-organizer, resulting in substantial participation by government officials.
Panel discussions and presentations ranged far and wide, covering the economy, individual sectors and the political environment. Below, we summarize the key takeaways in six sections:

Macro Economic Policy
The Rule of Law and the investment climate
Mining Sector Strategy
Energy Policy
Transport Infrastructure
Finance and Banking Sector

 

Please click HERE to view Key Takeaways English version

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Copper prices fall www.mining.com

Copper prices fell 0.71 per cent to $6,993 a tonne during Wednesday’s midmorning trade.

Analysts say they were expecting such a dip following Tuesday’s rally when the red metal touched one-week highs and rose above $7,000 a tonne based on bullish Chinese import data.

In fact, SHFE copper, the most-traded copper contract on the Shanghai Futures Exchange, closed down 1.28 per cent at 54,590 yuan ($8,220.27) per tonne.

The overall drop is also attributable to investors getting calmer once China's National Communist Party Congress concluded with the announcement that President Xi Jinping will remain in power and few immediate changes should take place in the realm of economic policy.

Dragging on prices were also data from Chilean mining association Sonami. According to the organization, the 2018 copper output from the South American country will rise 7 per cent year-over-year.

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'Golden Arches': McDonald's gets new China name following unit sale www.reuters.com

SHANGHAI (Reuters) - U.S. fast food giant McDonald’s Corp (MCD.N) is getting a name change in China - at least on paper.

The firm will change its registered business name to “Golden Arches (China) Co Ltd”, a spokeswoman confirmed to Reuters on Thursday, adding though that its brand name in China - a transliteration of McDonald’s - would be unchanged.

The shift comes after the chain agreed earlier in the year to sell most of its China and Hong Kong business to CITIC Ltd (0267.HK) and Carlyle Group (CG.O). The business plans to nearly double the number of its outlets in mainland China to 4,500 by 2022.

“It will still be clearly ‘McDonald‘s’ when diners come to our stores,” the chain said on its official China microblog.

“Our restaurant name will remain the same, the change is only at business license level,” spokeswoman Regina Hui added in emailed comments to Reuters. She declined to comment further on the reason for the change.

McDonald’s in China and Hong Kong is 52 percent owned by CITIC, while Carlyle has a 28 percent stake. McDonald’s itself retains a 20 percent interest in the business.

The structure is aimed at improving sales at existing stores and expanding outlets. Fast-food firms including McDonald’s and rival Yum China’s (YUMC.N) KFC are bouncing back from a series of food-supply scandals in China that had dented performance.

McDonald’s reported robust sales on Tuesday, including better-than-expected growth in the United States and strong performances in Canada, Britain and China.

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